Master of the coral reef – The Giant Moray Eel

by   Profile Mares   When 12th May 2017
5
DSC_1783
16
DSC_6090
DSC_1782-2
SDT_9415

Sometimes ugly, sometimes frightening,
and of imposing size, the Giant Moray Eel is the master of the coral reefs of
the Red Sea. With incredibly flexible, adaptable bodies, they easily slide through
the narrowest passages among the corals. Even if they are not in a bad mood,
their menacing appearance and their strong jaws command respect from divers.
Mutual respect and admiration is the desirable relationship required between a
diver and a Giant Moray Eel.


Do you like snakes?
Well if you met a Giant Moray Eel, which can grow to 3 meters in length and
weigh roughly 30kg, in the warm waters around Egypt, you would think at first
that you are looking at a large snake. Their dorsal, caudal and anal fins are
joined, meaning they look more like snakes than fish. Moray’s are shy by nature
and are to be found hiding among corals and rocks. They are easily identified
by their leopard skin pattern and black colouring around their gill openings.
Don’t be fooled by their sluggish appearance though! Morays can move very fast
and are extremely flexible.


Their little eyes make
them almost cute looking but are not very useful to them as they depend on
their excellent sense of smell to locate their food. They are not fussy eaters
and will be happy with a breakfast consisting of crustaceans, lunch with
molluscs and cephalopods and some fish for dinner.


Morays are night
hunters, but won't say no to a quick snack if it passes by during the day. They
make a perfect team with Roving Coral Groupers when they squeeze into crevices
and scare their prey which often swims into the mouth of a patiently waiting
grouper. The eels actively recruit the groupers by shaking their heads from
side to side encouraging them to join them in the hunt.


Even though they are
not the friendliest looking fish, they do not attack unprovoked and avoid
confrontation by hiding out of the way; but when provoked or tempted with food,
they can do some considerable damage. Many over eager and foolish divers who
have tried to hand feed Giant Moray Eels have lost their fingers to their
menacing bite. The Giant Moray’s bite is very special; it inspired the creator
of ‘Alien’
to develop his character with two sets of jaws. When Morays strike, once latched
on, they are unable to let go as they are the only fish with two sets of jaws.
The first grabs the prey and holds it, while the second set of jaws positioned
in their throat pulls the victim into their digestive system. There is no
escape once captured…does that sound horrible enough to deter you from feeding
eels???


Another interesting
fact about the Giant Moray is that they literally die for sex… well, not exactly sex, but to reproduce. They
sometimes need to travel over 4000 miles to find the perfect mate or place to
breed. They have both female and male organs, so there is no problem if the
ideal mate is of the opposite sex. Well… It’s both anyway! Win/win situation
you would think, but this is not the case. They make the ultimate sacrifice to
produce offspring. After waiting until the temperature of the water rises to
the ideal temperature for their offspring, they release their eggs and sperm in
an embrace and…die…


The baby eels, called elvers,
once hatched, float in the ocean for around eight months, and it takes them
three years before they find the perfect home where they will eventually settle
and have a life expectancy of between 6 to 36 years.


Not many people eat
Giant Moray Eels which are thought to contain high levels of Ciguatoxin which
is dangerous to humans. Unless they are caught by a fisherman by accident they
can live happily in the warm waters of Egypt until nature calls.


In summary, the Giant
Moray Eels of Egypt are sometimes ugly, sometimes frightening and of imposing
size, and they are masters of the coral reefs of the Red Sea. With incredibly
flexible and adaptable bodies, they easily slide through the narrowest passages
among the corals. Even if they are not in a bad mood, their menacing appearance
and their strong jaws command respect from divers. Mutual respect and
admiration is the desirable relationship required between a diver and a Giant Moray
Eel.


Authors:


Janez
Kranjc
, MARES ambassador in cooperation with Bogna Griffin, Marine Biology Student
GMIT (Galway Mayo Institute of Technology), Ireland.



www.subal.com


www.keldanlights.com

Written by
Profile Mares
Date
When 12th May 2017
Where
Location Mar Rosso

Share
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on Pinterest
COMMENTS
James Griffin on May 13th 2017
Photo no 5 is amazing, the Moray resembles an underwater T-Rex :)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Also by Mares